How Much Caffeine in a Cup of Coffee? A Detailed Guide

Coffee is the biggest dietary source of caffeine. You can expect to get around 95 mg of caffeine from an average cup of coffee. However, this amount varies between different coffee drinks, and can range from almost zero to over 500 mg. This is a detailed guide to the caffeine content of different types and brands of coffee.

What Factors Affect Caffeine Content?

The caffeine content of coffee depends on many factors, such as:

  • Type of coffee beans: There are many varieties of coffee beans available, which may naturally contain different amounts of caffeine.
  • Roasting: Lighter roasts have more caffeine than darker roasts, although the darker roasts have a deeper flavor.
  • Type of coffee: The caffeine content can vary significantly between regularly brewed coffee, espresso, instant coffee and decaf coffee.

Serving size: “One cup of coffee” can range anywhere from 30–700 ml (1–24 oz), greatly affecting the total caffeine content.

Bottom Line: Caffeine content is affected by the type of coffee bean, roast style, how the coffee is prepared and the serving size.

How Much Caffeine is in a Cup of Coffee?

The main determinant of caffeine content is the type of coffee you are drinking.

Brewed Coffee

Brewing is the most common way to make coffee in the US and Europe. Also known as regular coffee, brewed coffee is made by pouring hot or boiling water over ground coffee beans, usually contained in a filter. One cup of brewed coffee (8 oz) contains about 70–140 mg of caffeine, or about 95 mg on average.

Espresso

Espresso is made by forcing a small amount of hot water, or steam, through finely ground coffee beans. Although espresso has more caffeine per volume than regular coffee, it usually contains less per serving, since espresso servings tend to be small. One shot of espresso is generally about 30–50 ml (1–1.75 oz), and contains about 63 mg of caffeine. A double shot of espresso therefore contains roughly 125 mg of caffeine.

Espresso-Based Drinks

Many popular coffee drinks are made from espresso shots mixed with varying types and amounts of milk. These include lattes, cappuccinos, macchiatos and Americanos. Since the milk does not contain any additional caffeine, these drinks contain the same amount of caffeine as straight espresso. A single (small) contains about 63 mg of caffeine on average, and double (large) contains about 125 mg.

Instant Coffee

Instant coffee is made from brewed coffee that has been freeze-dried or spray-dried. It is generally in large, dry pieces, which dissolve in water. To prepare instant coffee, simply mix one or two teaspoons of dried coffee with hot water. There is no need for any brewing. Instant coffee usually contains less caffeine than regular coffee, with one 8-oz cup (237 ml) containing roughly 30–60 mg.

Decaf Coffee

Although the name may be deceiving, decaf coffee is not entirely caffeine free. It may contain varying amounts of caffeine, ranging from 0–7 mg per cup, with the average cup containing 3 mg. However, some varieties may contain even higher amounts of caffeine, depending on the type of coffee, method of de-caffeination and cup size.

Bottom Line: The average caffeine content of an 8-oz, brewed cup of coffee is 95 mg. A single espresso or espresso-based drink contains 63 mg, and decaf coffee contains about 3 mg of caffeine (on average).

Are Commercial Brands More Caffeinated?

Some commercial coffee brands contain more caffeine than regular, home-brewed coffee. Coffee shops are also notorious for their large cup sizes, which can range up to 700 ml (24 oz). The amount of coffee in such cups is equivalent to about 3–5 regular-sized cups of coffee.

Starbucks

Starbucks is probably the best-known coffee shop in the world. It also offers some of the most caffeinated coffee available. The caffeine content of brewed coffee at Starbucks is as follows:

  • Short (8 oz): 180 mg
  • Tall (12 oz): 260 mg
  • Grande (16 oz): 330 mg
  • Venti (20 oz): 415 mg

Furthermore, one shot of espresso at Starbucks contains 75 mg of caffeine. Consequently, all small, espresso-based drinks also contain 75 mg of caffeine. This includes lattes, cappuccinos, macchiatos and Americanos, among others. Larger sizes, which are made with two, or even three, espresso shots (16 oz), likewise contain 150 or 225 mg of caffeine. Decaf coffee from Starbucks contains 15–30 mg of caffeine, depending on cup size.

Bottom Line: An 8-oz, brewed coffee from Starbucks contains 180 mg of caffeine. A single espresso and espresso-based drinks contain 75 mg, while an 8-oz cup of decaf coffee contains about 15 mg of caffeine.

McDonald’s

McDonald’s sells coffee all over the world, often under their McCafe brand. However, despite being one of the biggest fast food chains that sells coffee, they do not standardize or calculate the amount of caffeine in their coffee. As an estimate, the caffeine content of their brewed coffee is about:

  • Small (12 oz): 109 mg
  • Medium (16 oz): 145 mg
  • Large (21–24 oz): 180 mg

Their espresso contains 71 mg per serving, and decaf contains 8–14 mg, depending on the size of the cup.

Bottom Line: McDonald’s doesn’t standardize the amount of caffeine in their coffee. As an estimate, a small cup of brewed coffee contains 109 mg of caffeine. Espresso contains about 71 mg, and decaf has about 8 mg.

Dunkin Donuts

Dunkin Donuts is another chain of coffee and donut shops that is very popular worldwide. The caffeine content of their brewed coffee is as follows:

  • Small (10 oz): 215 mg
  • Medium (16 oz): 302 mg
  • Large (20 oz): 431 mg
  • Extra large (24 oz): 517 mg

Their single espresso shot contains 75 mg of caffeine, which is also how much you can expect to get from their espresso-based drinks. Decaf coffee from Dunkin Donuts may also contain quite a bit of caffeine. According to one source, a small cup (10 oz) has 53 mg of caffeine, and a large cup (24 oz) contains 128 mg. That’s almost as much caffeine as you find in other varieties of regular coffee.

Bottom Line: A small cup of coffee from Dunkin Donuts contains 215 mg of caffeine, while a single espresso contains 75 mg. Interestingly, their decaf coffee may contain as much as 53-128 mg of caffeine.

Is Caffeine Something to Worry About?

Coffee is high in antioxidants, and many studies show that it is good for your health. However, getting too much caffeine is linked to adverse effects like anxiety, sleep disruptions, heart palpitations and restlessness. Consuming 400–600 mg/day of caffeine is generally not associated with adverse effects in most people. This is about 6 mg/kg (3 mg/lb) of body weight, or 4–6 average cups of coffee per day. That being said, caffeine affects people very differently. Some are very sensitive to it while others find themselves unaffected by large amounts. This is largely due to genetic differences. You’ll just have to experiment and see what amount suits you best.

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Detox Diets 101: Do These “Cleanses” Really Work?

Detoxification (detox) diets are more popular than ever. These diets claim to clean the blood and eliminate harmful toxins from the body. However, it is not entirely clear how they do this, what they’re supposed to eliminate and if they actually work. This is a detailed review of detox diets and their health effects.

What is a Detox?

Detox diets are generally short-term dietary interventions designed to eliminate toxins from the body. A typical detox diet involves a period of fasting, followed by a strict diet of fruit, vegetables, fruit juices and water. Sometimes a detox also includes herbs, teas, supplements and colon cleanses or enemas. This is claimed to:

  • Rest the organs by fasting.
  • Stimulate the liver to get rid of toxins.
  • Promote toxin elimination through feces, urine and sweat.
  • Improve circulation.
  • Provide the body with healthy nutrients.

Detox therapies are most commonly recommended because of exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment or diet. These include pollutants, synthetic chemicals, heavy metals and other harmful compounds. These diets are also claimed to help with various health problems, including obesity, digestive issues, autoimmune diseases, inflammation, allergies, bloating and chronic fatigue. However, human research on detox diets is lacking, and the handful of studies that have been published suffer from significant limitations.

Bottom Line: Detoxes are short-term interventions designed to eliminate toxins from the body. They are claimed to help with various health problems.

The Most Common Ways to Detox

There are many ways to do a detox diet, ranging from total starvation fasts and juicing to simpler food modifications. Most detox diets involve at least one of the following:

  • Fasting for 1–3 days.
  • Drinking fresh fruit and vegetable juices, smoothies, water and tea.
  • Drinking only specific liquids, such as salted water or lemon juice.
  • Eliminating foods high in heavy metals, contaminants and allergens.
  • Taking supplements or herbs.
  • Avoiding all allergenic foods, and then slowly reintroducing them.
  • Using laxatives, colon cleanses or enemas.
  • Exercising regularly.
  • Completely eliminating alcohol, coffee, cigarettes and refined sugar

The different detox diets vary in intensity and duration.

Bottom Line: There are many kinds of detoxes. Some of them involve fasting, eating specific foods, avoiding harmful ingredients and taking supplements.

Which Toxins are Eliminated?

Detox diets rarely identify the specific toxins they aim to remove or how exactly they eliminate them. In fact, there is little to no evidence that detox diets actually remove any “toxins” from your body. More importantly, there is really no scientific evidence backing up the claim that our bodies are loaded with toxins and need to be cleansed. Your body is actually very capable of cleansing itself, through the liver, feces, urine and sweat. The liver makes toxic substances harmless, and then makes sure they’re released from the body. Despite this, there are a few chemicals that may not be as easily removed by these processes, including persistent organic pollutants, pthalates, bisphenol A (BPA) and heavy metals. These tend to accumulate in fat tissue or blood and can take a very long time, even years, for the body to get rid of. However, generally speaking, these compounds are removed from or limited in commercial products today. All that being said, there is little evidence that detox diets actually help remove any of these compounds.

Bottom Line: Detox diets rarely identify the specific toxins they’re removing, and there is little evidence that they even remove any toxins. Your body can clear itself of most toxins through the liver, feces, urine and sweat.

Do Detox Diets Work?

Some people report feeling more focused and energetic during and after detox diets. However, this improved well-being may simply be due to eliminating processed foods, alcohol and other unhealthy substances from your diet. You may also be getting vitamins and minerals that were lacking before. On the other hand, many people also report feeling very unwell during the detox period. There is some evidence from animal studies that indicates coriander, an algae called Chlorella, and several types of fruit acids and pectin may help eliminate toxic metals and organic pollutants.

Detox Diets and Weight Loss

Currently, very few scientific studies have investigated the effectiveness of detox diets for losing weight. While some people may lose a lot of weight quickly, this seems to be due to loss of fluid and carb stores, rather than fat. This weight is therefore usually regained quickly once you start eating normally again. The weight loss effects of one detox diet, called the “lemon detox diet,” was studied recently in overweight Korean women. It involves consuming only a mixture of organic maple or palm syrups and lemon juice for 7 days. This diet significantly reduced body weight, body mass index, body fat percentage, waist to hip ratio and waist circumference, in addition to reducing markers of inflammation in the body. The results also indicate a beneficial effect on hormones by reducing insulin resistance and circulating leptin levels. If a detox diet involves severe calorie restriction, then it will most certainly cause weight loss and improvements in metabolic health. However, this type of “crash” dieting probably won’t lead to long-term results unless you change your lifestyle at the same time.

Bottom Line: Studies linking detox diets to weight loss are lacking. Some indicate that detox diets may help with short-term weight loss.

Detox Diets, Short-Term Fasting and Stress

Several varieties of detox diets may have effects similar those from short-term fasting, or intermittent fasting. Short-term fasting may improve various disease markers in some people, including improved leptin and insulin sensitivity. However, these effects do not apply to everyone. Studies in women have shown that both a 48-hour fast and a 3-week period of reduced calorie intake may increase the levels of stress hormones. On top of that, crash diets can be a stressful experience. They involve resisting temptation and feeling hunger and deprivation.

Bottom Line: Some detox diets may resemble intermittent fasting regimes, which can improve some biomarkers of health.

Beneficial Aspects of Detox Diets

There are a few aspects of detox diets that may have health benefits.

These include:

Following these guidelines is generally linked with improved health, no matter whether they involve a detox or not.

Bottom Line: Several aspects of detox diets are generally linked with improved health. These include avoiding environmental toxins, exercising, eating nutritious food, drinking water, limiting stress and relaxing.

Safety and Side Effects

Before doing any sort of “detox,” it is important to consider possible side effects.

Severe Calorie Restriction

Several detox diets recommend fasting or severe calorie restriction. Short-term fasting and limited calorie intake can result in fatigue, irritability and bad breath. Long-term fasting can result in energy, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, as well as electrolyte imbalance and even death. Furthermore, colon cleansing methods, which are sometimes recommended during detoxes, can cause dehydration, cramping, bloating, nausea and vomiting.

Overdosing

Some detox diets may pose the risk of overdosing on supplements, laxatives, diuretics and even water. There is a lack of regulation and monitoring in the detox industry, and many detox foods and supplements may not have any scientific basis. In the worst cases, the components of detox products may not match their labels. This can lead to overdose, resulting in serious, and even fatal, effects.

Who Should Avoid Detox Diets?

Some groups of people should not start any detox programs or calorie-restricting regimens, at least not without consulting with a doctor first. This includes children, adolescents, elderly people, the malnourished, pregnant or lactating women and people who have blood sugar issues or medical conditions, such as diabetes or an eating disorder.

Bottom Line: Detox diets may severely limit energy and nutrient intake. Some also include approaches and supplements that can be harmful. Some groups of people should never do detox diets.

Don’t Put Junk in Your Body

People encounter toxic substances all the time. Most of the time, your body does a perfectly good job of removing them without any additional help. However, if doing a detox diet makes you start eating and feeling better, then it is a great thing. But this probably has nothing to do with eliminating toxins, but simply the fact that you’re putting less junk in your body. A much smarter approach is to avoid putting toxic things (junk food, cigarette smoke, etc) in your body in the first place. If you don’t “tox” then there’s no need to detox!

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30 Easy Ways to Lose Weight Naturally (Backed by Science)

There is a lot of bad weight loss information on the internet. Much of what is recommended is questionable at best, and not based on any actual science. However, there are several natural methods that have actually been proven to work. Here are 30 easy ways to lose weight naturally, which are supported by science.

1. Add Protein to Your Diet

When it comes to weight loss, protein is the king of nutrients. Your body burns calories when digesting and metabolizing the protein you eat, so a high-protein diet can boost metabolism by up to 80-100 calories per day. A high-protein diet can also make you feel more full and reduce your appetite. In fact, some studies show that people eat over 400 fewer calories per day on a high-protein diet. Even something as simple as eating a high-protein breakfast (like eggs) can have a powerful effect

2. Eat Whole, Single-Ingredient Foods

One of the best things you can do to become healthier is to base your diet on whole, single-ingredient foods. By doing this, you eliminate the vast majority of added sugar, added fat and processed food. Most whole foods are naturally very filling, making it a lot easier to keep within healthy calorie limits. Furthermore, eating whole foods also provides your body with the many essential nutrients that it needs to function properly. Weight loss often follows as a natural “side effect” of eating whole foods.

3. Avoid Processed Foods

Processed foods are usually high in added sugars, added fats and calories. What’s more, processed foods are engineered to make you eat as much as possible. They are much more likely to cause addictive-like eating than unprocessed foods.

4. Stock Up on Healthy Foods and Snacks

Studies have shown that the food you keep at home greatly affects weight and eating behavior. By always having healthy food available, you reduce the chances of you or other family members eating unhealthy. There are also many healthy and natural snacks that are easy to prepare and take with you on the go. These include yogurt, whole fruit, nuts, carrots and hard-boiled eggs.

5. Limit Your Intake of Added Sugar

Eating a lot of added sugar is linked with some of the world’s leading diseases, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer. On average, Americans eat about 15 teaspoons of added sugar each day. This amount is usually hidden in various processed foods, so you may be consuming a lot of sugar without even realizing it. Since sugar goes by many names in ingredient lists, it can be very difficult to figure out how much sugar a product actually contains. Minimizing your intake of added sugar is a great way to improve your diet.

6. Drink Water

There is actually truth to the claim that drinking water can help with weight loss. Drinking 0.5 liters (17 oz) of water may increase the calories you burn by 24–30% for an hour afterward. Drinking water before meals may also lead to reduced calorie intake, especially for middle-aged and older people. Water is particularly good for weight loss when it replaces other beverages that are high in calories and sugar.

7. Drink (Unsweetened) Coffee

Fortunately, people are realizing that coffee is a healthy beverage that is loaded with antioxidants and other beneficial compounds. Coffee drinking may support weight loss by increasing energy levels and the amount of calories you burn. Caffeinated coffee may boost your metabolism by 3–11% and reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by a whopping 23–50%. Furthermore, black coffee is very weight loss friendly, since it can make you feel full but contains almost no calories.

8. Supplement With Glucomannan

Glucomannan is one of several weight loss pills that has been proven to work. This water-soluble, natural dietary fiber comes from the roots of the konjac plant, also known as the elephant yam. Glucomannan is low in calories, takes up space in the stomach and delays stomach emptying. It also reduces the absorption of protein and fat, and feeds the beneficial gut bacteria. Its exceptional ability to absorb water is believed to be what makes it so effective for weight loss. One capsule is able to turn an entire glass of water into gel.

9. Avoid Liquid Calories

Liquid calories come from beverages like sugary soft drinks, fruit juices, chocolate milk and energy drinks. These drinks are bad for health in several ways, including an increased risk of obesity. One study showed a drastic 60% increase in the risk of obesity among children, for each daily serving of a sugar-sweetened beverage. It’s also important to note that your brain does not register liquid calories the same way it does solid calories, so you end up adding these calories on top of everything else that you eat.

10. Limit Your Intake of Refined Carbs

Refined carbs are carbs that have had most of their beneficial nutrients and fiber removed. The refining process leaves nothing but easily digested carbs, which can increase the risk of overeating and disease. The main dietary sources of refined carbs are white flour, white bread, white rice, sodas, pastries, snacks, sweets, pasta, breakfast cereals and added sugar.

11. Fast Intermittently

Intermittent fasting is an eating pattern that cycles between periods of fasting and eating. There are a few different ways to do intermittent fasting, including the 5:2 diet, the 16:8 method and the eat-stop-eat method. Generally, these methods make you eat fewer calories overall, without having to consciously restrict calories during the eating periods. This should lead to weight loss, as well as numerous other health benefits.

12. Drink (Unsweetened) Green Tea

Green tea is a natural beverage that is loaded with antioxidants. Drinking green tea is linked with many benefits, such as increased fat burning and weight loss. Green tea may increase energy expenditure by 4% and increase selective fat burning by up to 17%, especially harmful belly fat. Matcha green tea is a variety of powdered green tea that may have even more powerful health benefits than regular green tea.

13. Eat More Fruits and Vegetables

Fruits and vegetables are extremely healthy, weight-loss-friendly foods. In addition to being high in water, nutrients and fiber, they usually have very low energy density. This makes it possible to eat large servings without consuming too many calories. Numerous studies have shown that people who eat more fruits and vegetables tend to weigh less.

14. Count Calories Once in a While

Being aware of what you’re eating is very helpful when trying to lose weight. There are several effective ways to do this, including counting calories, keeping a food diary or taking pictures of what you eat. Using an app or another electronic tool may be even more beneficial than writing in a food diary.

15. Use Smaller Plates

Some studies have shown that using smaller plates helps you eat less, because it changes how you see portion sizes. People seem to fill their plates the same, regardless of plate size, so they end up putting more food on larger plates than smaller ones. Using smaller plates reduces how much food you eat, while giving you the perception of having eaten more.

16. Try a Low-Carb Diet

Many studies have shown that low-carb diets are very effective for weight loss. Limiting carbs and eating more fat and protein reduces your appetite and helps you eat fewer calories. This can result in weight loss that is up to 3 times greater than that from a standard low-fat diet. A low-carb diet can also improve many risk factors for disease.

17. Eat More Slowly

If you eat too fast, you may eat way too many calories before your body even realizes that you are full. Faster eaters are much more likely to become obese, compared to those who eat more slowly. Chewing more slowly may help you eat fewer calories and increase the production of hormones that are linked to weight loss.

18. Replace Some Fat with Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is high in fats called medium-chain triglycerides, which are metabolized differently than other fats. Studies show that they can boost your metabolism slightly, while helping you eat fewer calories. Coconut oil may be especially helpful in reducing the harmful belly fat. Note that this does not mean that you should add this fat to your diet, but simply replace some of your other fat sources with coconut oil.

19. Add Eggs to Your Diet

Eggs are the ultimate weight loss food. They are cheap, low in calories, high in protein and loaded with all sorts of nutrients. High-protein foods have been shown to reduce appetite and increase fullness, compared to foods that contain less protein. Furthermore, eating eggs for breakfast may cause up to 65% greater weight loss over 8 weeks, compared to eating bagels for breakfast. It may also help you eat fewer calories throughout the rest of the day.

20. Spice Up Your Meals

Chili peppers and jalapenos contain a compound called capsaicin, which may boost metabolism and increase the burning of fat. Capsaicin may also reduce appetite and calorie intake .

21. Take Probiotics

Probiotics are live bacteria that have health benefits when eaten. They can improve digestive health and heart health, and may even help with with weight loss. Studies have shown that overweight and obese people tend to have different gut bacteria than normal-weight people, which may influence weight. Probiotics may help regulate the healthy gut bacteria. They may also block the absorption of dietary fat, while reducing appetite and inflammation. Of all the probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus gasseri shows the most promising effects on weight loss.

22. Get Enough Sleep

Getting enough sleep is incredibly important for weight loss, as well as to prevent future weight gain. Studies have shown that sleep-deprived people are up to 55% more likely to become obese, compared to those who get enough sleep. This number is even higher for children. This is partly because sleep deprivation disrupts the daily fluctuations in appetite hormones, leading to poor appetite regulation.

23. Eat More Fiber

Fiber-rich foods may help with weight loss. Foods that contain water-soluble fiber may be especially helpful, since this type of fiber can help increase the feeling of fullness. Fiber may delay stomach emptying, make the stomach expand and promote the release of satiety hormones. Ultimately, this makes us eat less naturally, without having to think about it. Furthermore, many types of fiber can feed the friendly gut bacteria. Healthy gut bacteria have been linked with a reduced risk of obesity. Just make sure to increase your fiber intake gradually to avoid abdominal discomfort, such as bloating, cramps and diarrhea.

24. Brush Your Teeth After Meals

Many people brush or floss their teeth after eating, which may help limit the desire to snack or eat between meals. This is because many people do not feel like eating after brushing their teeth. Plus, it can make food taste bad. Therefore, if you brush or use mouthwash after eating, you may be be less tempted to grab an unnecessary snack.

25. Combat Your Food Addiction

Food addiction involves overpowering cravings and changes in your brain chemistry that make it harder to resist eating certain foods. This is a major cause of overeating for many people, and affects a significant percentage of the population. In fact, a recent 2014 study found that almost 20% of people fulfilled the criteria for food addiction. Some foods are much more likely to cause symptoms of addiction than others. This includes highly processed junk foods that are high in sugar, fat or both. The best way to beat food addiction is to seek help.

26. Do Some Sort of Cardio

Doing cardio — whether it is jogging, running, cycling, power walking or hiking — is a great way to burn calories and improve both mental and physical health. Cardio has been shown to improve many risk factors for heart disease. It can also help reduce body weight. Cardio seems to be particularly effective at reducing the dangerous belly fat that builds up around your organs and causes metabolic disease.

27. Add Resistance Exercises

Loss of muscle mass is a common side effect of dieting. If you lose a lot of muscle, your body will start burning fewer calories than before. By lifting weights regularly, you’ll be able to prevent this loss in muscle mass. As an added benefit, you’ll also look and feel much better.

28. Use Whey Protein

Most people get enough protein from diet alone. However, for those who don’t, taking a whey protein supplement is an effective way to boost protein intake. One study shows that replacing part of your calories with whey protein can cause significant weight loss, while also increasing lean muscle mass. Just make sure to read the ingredients list, because some varieties are loaded with added sugar and other unhealthy additives.

29. Practice Mindful Eating

Mindful eating is a method used to increase awareness while eating. It helps you make conscious food choices and develop awareness of your hunger and satiety cues. It then helps you eat healthy in response to those cues. Mindful eating has been shown to have significant effects on weight, eating behavior and stress in obese individuals. It is especially helpful against binge eating and emotional eating. By making conscious food choices, increasing your awareness and listening to your body, weight loss should follow naturally and easily.

30. Focus on Changing Your Lifestyle

Dieting is one of those things that almost always fails in the long term. In fact, people who “diet” tend to gain more weight over time. Instead of focusing only on losing weight, make it a primary goal to nourish your body with healthy food and nutrients. Eat to become a healthier, happier, fitter person — not just to lose weight.

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